The Bayer USA Foundation Awards More Than $70,000 To North Carolina Nonprofits

Bayer CropScience recently announced that the Bayer USA Foundation has awarded more than $70,000 to North Carolina nonprofit organizations, including the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wake County, Dress for Success® Triangle NC, John Avery Boys & Girls Club of Durham, Keep NC Beautiful, Lucy Daniels Center, Make-A-Wish® Eastern North Carolina, North Carolina Theatre, The Queen’s Foundation, Inc., Shepherd's Table Soup Kitchen, and Wake Education Partnership. These gifts are part of the Bayer USA Foundation’s nearly $1.5 million in grants to nonprofits nationwide for the first half of 2013. The grants support STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education as well as other social service and community development initiatives in several of Bayer’s major business communities in the U.S.

USDA Projects Sizable Net Farm Income Increase

Net farm income is now forecast to be 131-billion dollars in 2013. That’s up 15.1-percent from 2012’s estimate of 113.8-billion. After adjusting for inflation – net farm income in 2013 is expected to be the highest since 1973. Expenses are projected up 10.9-billion in 2013 to 352-billion dollars. That would be the highest on record in both nominal and inflation-adjusted dollars. USDA says labor and rent are the expense items expected to increase most in 2013 – with producers expected to pay less for fuel and fertilizer.

New Visa Waiver Unpopular

A new Obama immigration change quietly passed in mid-November will allow some immigrants stay longer than the system currently allows. The new policy says people who entered from one of the 37 Visa Waiver countries and have a US relative here can stay passed the 90 days that program currently allows.


Ira Mehlman a spokesperson for the Federation for American Immigration Reform doesn't like the change because the visa waiver program is based on trust

Increase in Beef Prices have Pulled Pork & Chicken Up

The historic drought in the southern plains in the past two years has decimated cow numbers. The shortage of forage forced cattlemen to liquidate their herds. At one point – there were reports of so many cows being shipped to auction barns that some barns stopped accepting cows.
Now there is a need for those cows to produce the calves and the beef needed to meet strong demand – according to Collin Woodall with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.


There’s good reason to worry. Woodall acknowledges the difficulty in convincing a producer to hold back a heifer that can be sold for near-record high money today. Pork, chicken and turkey have all seen their share of the consumer meat dollar grow as the price of beef has increased.

 


A native of the Texas Panhandle, Rhonda was born and raised on a cotton farm where she saw cotton farming evolve from ditch irrigation to center pivot irrigation and harvest trailers to modules. After graduating from Texas Tech University, she got her start in radio with KGNC News Talk 710 in Amarillo, Texas.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*