Super Broccoli Being Developed at Kannapolis

We already know that broccoli is one of the healthiest foods there is. And Dr. Allan Brown, Assistant Prof. NCSU, Dept of Horticultural Science, Plants for Human Health Institute in Kannapolis, NC recently received a grant to make the green vegetable healthier still:

“We spend billions and billions of dollars on drug therapies and ways of correcting health disorders and we don’t spend as much on prevention. When it comes to things like age related macular degeneration, developing cataract, two of the best things you can do is avoid tobacco and cigarettes and eating more green vegetables like broccoli, and its high levels of lutein.”
 

Brown explains the idea of adding lutein to a common vegetable actually came from the Asian diet:

“If you look at the Asian diet, they have much higher levels of lutein, and they have lower rates of this. But when they immigrate to the US, they are developing the same levels of these health issues as those that were born here.”
 

When this lutein-enriched broccoli becomes available, Brown explains how he anticipates it being marketed:
 

“I would love to see all broccoli have high levels of lutein, that would be the goal. It will be initially marketed as a healthier form of broccoli.”

And in research terminology, it won’t be long, either:
 

“I think in the next three to five years.”
 

Brown’s grant was made possible by the North Carolina Biotech Center and Monsanto. NCSU Assistant Prof. in the Dept of Horticultural Science, Plants for Human Health Institute in Kannapolis Dr. Allan Brown.


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