Pee Dee Soybean Producers Proactive on Kudzu Bug

In South Carolina’s Pee Dee region this year, rain was plentiful, then not, then plentiful, and so on. Jacob Stokes, the area agronomy agent with Clemson Extension in the Pee Dee region says the region’s corn yields reflected just that:

“It turned out better than last year, good in some places, and fair to average in others. It depended on the corn pollinating with the heat and lack of rain then the abundance of rain.”
 

The area’s peanut crop is looking good, albeit a little behind schedule:
 

“Peanuts tend to be a little behind normal as far as digging time, but most are dug and in the combine.”
 

Stokes explains that cotton and soybeans are progressing nicely:
 

“Cotton is starting to foliate in the area, and a few have started to harvest. Soybeans are changing colors and starting to mature, we should see some harvesting soon.”
 

Stokes explains that producers with soybeans were proactive when it came to kudzu bugs this year:

“We had a lot early and then they dwindled in numbers. Most were spraying and taking care of them pretty easily. I think when they start cutting the early beans, the population will jump in some of the later beans.”
 

After last year’s massive invasion of the pest, producers attended meetings and paid attention to the research presented, to their benefit:

“After seeing it last year, we have had a lot of research and some meetings on it. We’ve really got the message out and farmers have taken care of it.”
 

Pee Dee Region agronomist with Clemson University, Jacob Stokes


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