NC Ag Commissioner Troxler Reviews Latest Crop Progress Numbers

The September crop report from USDA came out recently and some of NC’s row crops did ok, some didn’t.

“There hasn’t been a lot of movement since the August report, but cotton did take a hit and we see declining yield projections for this crop. The latest forecast shows a yield of 699 pounds per acre down 76 pounds from Aug, we think there will be about 645,000 bales, a 45% drop from last year. Its both reduced acerage and yield.
 

The state average yield for corn is still on pace to tie a record of 132 bushels. In some parts of eastern NC the crop is very good, but when you look at the west there are many places that were washed out.
 

Flue cured tobacco is a little bit of a mystery because of the wet weather we have had. USDA is reporting a 300 million pound crop projection, but we have some people across the state that think it might be closer to 310 million pounds. It will depend on how much of the tobacco actually gets harvested before it frosts. There is also a lot still in the field, and that ties back to barn space. When you have a compressed crop like we had this year, they just have to do the best they can.
 

Prices for tobacco are good and farmers wish they ahd a lot more to sell. There is tremendous demand for our tobacco worldwide.

Peanuts did struggle, but they now look above average at about 3600 pounds to the acre. If you compare to last year, we had a record crop of 4100 pounds per acre.
 

My observation on soybeans is that maybe 30 bushels is a little low. In the piedmont we have had adequate water to make beans and I think we will do a bit better than 30.”

 


SFNToday.com is dedicated to serving the agricultural industry in the Carolinas and Virginia with the latest ag news, exclusive regional weather station readings, and key crop market information. The website is a companion of the Southern Farm Network, provider of daily agricultural radio programming to the Carolinas since 1974. SFNToday.com presents radio programs, interviews and news relevant to crop and livestock production and research throughout the mid-Atlantic agricultural community.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*