Emerald Ash Borer Found in Two More NC Counties

 

Add Cabarrus and Mitchell to the list of North Carolina counties where the emerald ash borer has been discovered. The invasive pest, which was discovered in the Asheville city limits in early June, has now been confirmed in 27 counties.   Host plants include all native ash trees and native white fringetree. The Chinese white fringetree, often planted for ornamental purposes, is believed to be resistant.

EAB is a metallic green beetle that bores into ash trees and feeds on tissues beneath the bark, ultimately killing the tree. The signs and symptoms of EAB aren’t always immediately noticeable because EAB damages the inside of the tree. Adult borers lay eggs on the bark of ash trees. When the eggs hatch, the larvae bore into the bark and feed on the transportation tissues of the tree. This disrupts the movement of nutrients and water within the tree, causing the tree’s slow death, typically in three to five years.

South Carolina All but Drought Free

In the latest drought monitor released by the Drought Mitigation Center on Thursday for conditions through Tuesday morning, South Carolina remains 99.9% drought free, with .1% of abnormally dry conditions being reported in Aiken County along the Georgia border.  At the start of the water year, September 27th, 2016, the Palmetto state was experiencing more than 73% abnormally dry conditions.

Syngenta Announces Goals Following Merger

Syngenta is striving to strengthen its leadership position in crop protection and to become an ambitious number three in the agriculture seeds sector. In a news release this week, the company announced its priorities now that the takeover deal by ChemChina is complete. The company aims to profitably grow market share through organic growth and collaborations, and is considering targeted acquisitions with a focus on seeds. Syngenta CEO Erik Frywald calls ChemChina a stable owner who will help Syngenta achieve its ambition.

BPI Settles With ABC over Pink Slime Lawsuit

Beef Products Inc. and ABC News have reached a settlement in a lawsuit over ABC’s use of the term pink slime. Meat industry publication Meatingplace reports that no terms of the settlement have been disclosed, but BPI announced that the company was “extraordinarily pleased” to have reached a settlement. ABC also released a statement, saying, “ABC has reached an amicable resolution of its dispute with the makers of lean finely textured beef.” BPI was suing the network and a lead reporter in a $1.9 billion case over ABC’s series of reports in spring 2012 that raised questions about lean finely textured beef’s suitability for human consumption. BPI closed three of four processing plants and laid off some 700 people in March 2012 after demand for lean finely textured beef plummeted.


A native of the Texas Panhandle, Rhonda was born and raised on a cotton farm where she saw cotton farming evolve from ditch irrigation to center pivot irrigation and harvest trailers to modules. After graduating from Texas Tech University, she got her start in radio with KGNC News Talk 710 in Amarillo, Texas.

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