Early Corn Harvest Could Lead to Third NC Crop

For the first time in about three years, North Carolina is sitting on adequate moisture for crop production. But, Kent Messick, Chief of the Agronomic Division for NCDA says the extremely dry conditions aren’t that far away:

“North Carolina has escaped the brunt of the drought conditions that are impacting the Midwest. Areas of South Carolina are also experiencing extreme drought, so its not that far away from us.”
 

And insect pressure also seems to be at a minimum according to Messick:
 

“I don’t think there has been any major impact. The Kudzu bug is still new here and people are still learning about it. Advisors are still trying to come up with the best recommendations and communicate those to growers.”
 

With meat and dairy prices expected to soar later in the year, peanut products often become an alternate source of protein, and this looks to be a good year for the state’s peanut producers:
 

“The peanut crop looks generally pretty good and prices have been up from previous years.”
 

Some of North Carolina’s earliest planted corn is being harvested this week, according to Messick:
 

“There is some being harvested in the coastal plain.”
 

And with that extremely early harvest, Messick says that producers may try something new this year:
 

“Related to the early harvest of corn, there are growers that are looking for second crops to come behind the corn. It may be a short growing season of soybeans or even grain sorghum. Right now its being tried on an experimental basis to see what happens.”
 

Chief of the Agronomic Division for NCDA, Kent Messick.

For more on the current drought click here.
 


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