Cover Crop Workshop this Friday

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 Clemson Extension is offering a workshop on cover crops at the Roper Mountain Science Center near Greenville on Friday, October 3rd   from 9:00 am until 5:00 pm.  The workshop will cover using cover crops in your current rotation, how to use cover crops in a no-till system, crop choices by season, and more.  For more information and a registration link, visit our website, SFNToday dot com.

https://shopping.clemson.edu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=103&products_id=754&zenid=4bh1p2ev4r54l2ocoo3qflcv01v

 Peak Soil Sample Season Coming Up

Peak season for soil testing in North Carolina is just around the corner, and with the peak season comes a $4 fee for each soil sample tested.  NCDA suggests to avoid fees, and have a faster turnaround, test early…before November 25th.  For a soil sample on the dock by 6pm on the 25th, the testing will be free, for samples received after that time, through March 31st, 2015, there will be a $4 fee per sample.  In 2013-14 the Soil Testing Section analyzed around 330,000 samples, with turnaround time of one to two weeks with the new peak-time fee structure.  In previous years there was still a significant backlog of samples through mid to late March.  Soil sample testing kits are available through your county Extension office, or your NCDA area agronomist. 

Heat Waves Could be Man-Made

Scientists looking at 16 cases of wild weather around the world last year see the fingerprints of man-made global warming on more than half of them, mostly heat waves, which they say, were intensified by the burining of fossil fuel…the same report says human factors were not necessarily evident in extreme storms and other events. Tom Karl, Director of NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, says it’s possible researchers may have missed some factors that COULD have been influenced by humans.

NPPC- Continue TPP without Japan

The latest round of trade talks between the United States and Japan ended without an agreement as market access for agricultural products including pork and beef remained a key stumbling block.

Japan’s Economy Minister Akira Amari and U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman met for two days in Washington last week for bilateral negotiations as part of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement that involves 12 countries.

The National Pork Producers Council said the proposed agreement should not create a precedent that shelters agriculture from competition and noted the U.S. pork industry has benefited greatly from prior trade pacts.

The pork group issued a lengthy statement calling for the talks to continue without Japan until it is ready to make progress.


A native of the Texas Panhandle, Rhonda was born and raised on a cotton farm where she saw cotton farming evolve from ditch irrigation to center pivot irrigation and harvest trailers to modules. After graduating from Texas Tech University, she got her start in radio with KGNC News Talk 710 in Amarillo, Texas.

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