ASF Requires Longer Feed Holding Times

African Swine Fever was confirmed in August of 2018. One of the first concerns was the ability of certain viruses to survive in different feed components. With certain feed ingredients imported from Asia, this issue took greater importance. To measure the viability of virus transmission when feed is in transport from Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe, researchers used Seneca Valley Virus as the model. Swine Health Information Center Executive Director Dr. Paul Sundberg says that research has been updated…

“The reason we used Seneca Valley was because we thought that it was the virus that was probably the hardiest and one that would last the longest. As we continued to go on, we wanted to make that our assumptions were correct. We did additional research and this new paper that we’re releasing about the holding time calculations for feed ingredients is based on that new research. We used African Swine Fever itself at the high biosecurity laboratory at Kansas State University and did the work down there to look at how it survives. What we found was that ASF survives significantly longer that what we expected and so it‘s a very important thing that we get this information out for people to take a look at, for people to talk about, and help enhance the safety of all feedstuffs in the U.S.

The new research regarding African Swine Fever takes a much longer feed holding times. For conventional and organic soybean meal, ASF needs approximately 125 days of holding time to degrade ASF to the accepted 99.9 percent level. Sundberg says the amount of soybean meat has declined since 2018…

“We continue to import vitamins, choline, amino acids, those types of things. It looks from the research we’ve got done that the soybean meal is probably the one that holds those viruses longer than any of the others. We don’t know why that is for sure. Again, we’re going to make an assumption and we think that it could be the protein content that’s in the soybean meal that helps protect the virus, because under the conditions of transport because that virus, put in media where it’s supposed to grow, will die off much faster and dries off naturally in soybean meal, so we think maybe there’s something to do with the protein content that helps protect the virus.”

The research findings can be found on the Swine Health Information Center website. There are also more details on biosecurity controls on that site. For more information, producers can contact the Pork Checkoff Service Center. Go to Pork. org or call 800-456-PORK.