2012 Cotton Field Day Covers as many Topics as Possible

The biennial 2012 Cotton Field day will be on Wednesday, September 12th at the Cotton Research & Extension Station near Rocky Mount. Dr. Jack Bacheler, professor and extension entomologist, NC State, specializing in insect management in cotton explains that the upcoming field day covers as many topics as possible:

“For example, there are a lot of agronomic things that sometimes change from year to year. So there will be talks about defoliation and planting considerations, as well as just about anything to do with the cotton crop. Insect management up this way has been a big consideration, including stink bugs. Also, cotton diseases, not only including diseases of the plant itself, but we have something called target spot this year, that has become a concern for some in the coastal plain. Cotton varieties is another area that is changing very fast, and also weed management, particularly with Palmer Amaranth, that is always a big topic and Allen York will be on hand to discuss that.”
 

In addition, according to Bacheler, NC State’s David Jordon will be discussing rotation techniques:
 

“There will be a section on nozzle technology and drift, which can be very important for cotton producers. For the first time, David Jordan, who works more on peanuts, is going to talk about long term rotations, which is sometimes a consideration in North Carolina.”
 

With resistant Palmer pigweed stealing the show these days, insect issues in cotton have taken a back seat, but Bacheler says they’re still out there:
 

“We don’t spray much for caterpillars anymore with the two gene varieties, but the stink bugs have moved in to fill that void. When we get a year like this year when we have had generally good rain fall, stink bugs can be a pretty big issue. So we will likely devote part of one of the stops to talk about ways to better manage stink bugs. A new card has been developed that has proved to be really popular, it gets more people involved in scouting and makes scouting more efficient and hopefully results in a more profitable way to manage stink bugs.”
 

And stink bug damage on cotton will be on display at this year’s field day, according to Bacheler:
 

“With a lot of insect pests, if you are on a wagon looking at the plots, the cotton looks the same, but its easy to show producers what you are talking about, and often the case with stink bugs if you pick a bunch of bolls that are damaged and ones that are clean and pass them around. If there is enough time people are always free to walk out into the plots.”
 

In addition to plot tours, there are several dinner speakers lined up for the event:
 

“Donny Lassiter, the President of the North Carolina Cotton Producers Association will speak. We will also have the administrator from NC State, the Associate Dean Sylvia Blankinship. And from the NCDA and consumer service division has appointed a new research director, Sandy Stewart. Recertification credits will also be given in different categories.”
 

Bacheler says that as many as 1,100 producers and agribusiness professionals have attended the Cotton Field Day in the past.
 

For more on the cotton field day, including a full schedule, visit our event page HERE. Our coverage of the cotton field day is brought to you by the North Carolina Cotton Producers Association and The Cotton Board.
 

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